Spotlight: Osinachi Immaculeta Creates Digital expressionist Paintings That Celebrate African Beauty

Spotlight: Osinachi Immaculeta Creates Digital expressionist Paintings That Celebrate African Beauty

 

 

Get familiar with the work of Nigerian visual artist Osinachi Immaculeta .

In our ‘Spotlight’ series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists and more who are producing vibrant, original work. In our latest piece, we spotlight Osinachi Immaculeta (Nachy), a Nigerian visual artist, using digital mediums to paint dream-like portraits of Africans. Osinachi Immaculeta is a product of the Art School of Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka in Anambra State. Mr Ejoh Wallace remains her mentor after undergoing Industrial training with him in the Universal Studios of Art, Lagos. She is known for her diverse use of recyclable materials, mixed media and unique artistic process, often questioning global gender and social issues. Osinachi Immaculeta‘s works have continued to evolve, remaining pertinent to developments in contemporary art. Read more about the inspirations behind her work below, and check out some of her stunning paintings underneath. Be sure to keep up with the artist on Instagram and Facebook.

 

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Advertisements

Briefly describe your background as an artist and what led to you creating art.

Osinachi Immaculeta :  My name is Osinachi Immaculeta Okafor (Nachy). I am from Azigbo town in Nnewi South L.G.A of Anambra State. I had my Primary education at Victory Early Learning Centre, Aba, Abia State. My early secondary education was at St Bridget’s College, Aba, Abia State. Then the latter half of my Secondary School was completed at Federal Government Girls College, Owerri.

I have always had interests in the Arts (Writings as seen at my website @teeniethink.blogspot.com and paintings at my Instagram account @nachisoeuvre). But this particular art flair was honed by my junior class art teacher, Aunty Esther Ochizi who believed in me. While she assisted others to complete their works, she left me to mine. She made me believe that I could do it all by myself. Back then, I thought she was being mean. Now, I know better.

Advertisements

Again, my secondary school art teacher, Mrs Morah discovered me and fine-tuned my skills the more. With the help of our numerous art tutors then whose names I cannot recall, we diversified in the art field. We learnt to weave, make cards and posters and even tie-dyes.

Advertisements

After an unsuccessful attempt to study Law, Political Science, International Relations, Economics, to mention but a few, I was finally admitted to Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State to study Fine and Applied Art. In my penultimate year, I met Uchay Joel Chima on Facebook. He encouraged me to specialize in painting. He said that there was a “future” in it. I wasn’t seeing it then because I found it very challenging at the time. I owe many thanks to Mr Fredrick Nwogem (Freddo), a Master’s student resident in the studio, who saw me through my trying times. Again, I lacked exposure to happenings in the art world. It was not until I went for industrial training in Lagos did I understand the meaning of a future in art. Artworks were being auctioned and sold at unbelievable exorbitant prices! But, you only get to this point when you have worked so hard and turned out numerous strong oeuvres that many art galleries and houses are familiar with your name (I am still on that journey. I must get there).

With the encouragement of Mr Ejoh, “Baba”, Mr Josh and the numerous other artists/instructors in the Universal Studios of Art where I underwent my I.T, I finally had faith in Art.

I have had my fair share of setbacks too. I had stopped painting for a while after graduation. I had felt so uninspired and withdrawn until Mr Ejoh Wallace, my former I.T (Industrial Training) instructor, gave me a call that changed my life forever. This was during the climax of the Coronavirus pandemic. In the latter days of November 2020, I started painting again! This time, professionally.

 

As an artist, I am drawn to situations around me; their causes and effects. So, I tend to address them using my paintings as a medium of expression.

As a child, wrote about virtually everything of interest to me, especially people and why they act the way they do. I have been curious about every single thing from the onset. I was and still am, an inquisitive child.  Now, my paintings complement my curiosity and writings.

 

What are the central messages or themes underpinning your work?

Osinachi Immaculeta :  The central themes of my work revolve around my life experiences and the social contexts that bothers not just me, but the society at large. My paintings could just be a reflection of my thoughts and emotions or a mirror of the societal happenings usually involving personifications

 

 

How do you decide who or what you’re going to paint?

Osinachi Immaculeta : I have evolved from a representational artist, which is what is referred to as academic paintings, to an expressionist. I love to play around with my colours. It was obvious during my school days. Now, I am no longer bound by laws to paint a certain way, so I have become even more free and unconventional. I am in my happy place because I am always excited when I see colours. I love the colours. If I am caught doing muted paintings, just know that I am experimenting. And somehow, I would still bring in colours to spice things up.

 

 

What would you describe as your best work thus far?

Osinachi Immaculeta : My best works are yet to come. I consider all my current works as my best works because I put in a lot of feelings and emotions into my paintings. All of them. Especially, since they are no longer school assignments for grades. I am in my happy place and I could not be happier. Special thanks to my family and friends and all my instructors who have been very supportive of my career.

 

 

“False System,” 2020

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

“Periodt,” 2020

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

“Silver lining,” 2020

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

“Flo,” 2020

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

“Periodt,” 2020

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

 

Advertisements

Advertisements

TOPNEWS MEDIA

For Advert and Promotion Contact us via email: topnewsmediagroup@gmail.com Contact us via Phone or Message us on Whatsapp : 09030455504, 08146428423

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: