Menu
Join our feeds to automatically receive the latest headlines, news, and information formatted for your club's website or news reader.

Top 7 critical signs to spot a Ponzi scheme before you are scammed

Written by

 

 

A Ponzi scheme is the last place you would want to invest in

Unfortunately, they don’t present as Ponzi schemes when requesting investments

To avoid losing your hard-earned money, these are the signs to watch out for

 

Hundreds of Nigerians have lost billions of naira to several Ponzi schemes in the last decade. Earlier this year, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) revealed that in the last three years, it has received no less than 1,000 letters filed against Ponzi scheme operators on a monthly basis.

 

The Mavrodi Mundial Movement (MMM) will perhaps remain the most popular of these Ponzi schemes that have ever operated in Nigeria. So many Nigerians were victims of these schemes and so much money was lost when the scheme finally crashed in 2017. According to the Central Bank of Nigeria, investors lost about N12 million to MMM.

 

Even after the crash of MMM, you would think that many would learn their lessons. But no, more people seem to have shifted to patronising newer illicit schemes, repeating the same cycle.

 

Ponzi schemes are unverified investment platforms that promise investors high and mouth-watering interests on their investments.

The name comes from Charles Ponzi, a 1920s notorious fraudster who operated a scheme where he promised investors a 40% return on their investments in 90 days until its final crash.

Ponzi schemes’ survival is dependent on a constant flow of new investor money which is used to pay existing investors while little to no actual investing is going on.

 

Signs that point to a Ponzi scheme

There are a lot of Ponzi schemes out there looking for victims to scam them of their hard-earned money. So it is only wise to learn how to spot them in order to save your resources. These are common traits among them.

Advertisement


 

Promise of High returns with no risk: When an investment scheme promises more than normal returns given by any conventional investment opportunity, then there is a need to be suspicious of it. Ponzi schemes, a lot of times promise up to a 100% return on investments. There’s no more obvious red flag than this.

Promise of consistent returns: Normally, markets fluctuate as investment markets rise and fall over time. When a promises consistently positive returns regardless of overall market conditions, then you should be skeptical.

 

Unregistered: Ponzi schemes usually have no registration history with a country’s financial regulators. In Nigeria for instance, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Central Bank of Nigeria and others license investment houses to operate in the country. Where these approvals and licenses are not available, it is only possible that one might be dealing with a Ponzi scheme.

Unlicensed sellers: Legitimate investments are usually sold by licensed operators unlike in the case of Ponzi schemes which are sold by unlicensed and unapproved operators. Always reach out to regulators to verify this.

 

Unclear paperwork: When the mathematics of the scheme doesn’t seem to be adding up, then one should be concerned. Also, errors in financial statements are also red flags.

 

Difficulty receiving payments: When the organisation begins to miss payments or you have difficulty making withdrawals, it is most likely a Ponzi scheme. A lot of times, they offer even higher returns to prevent investors from cashing out.

 

 

Article Categories:
African News · News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shares